Vote for your favorite Sci Fi Medical Doctor

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Vote for your favorite doctor (physician not PhD) on popular science fiction TV shows and movies. Some of them are not very nice.
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1

Leonard Mccoy

by Star Trek

Space, the final frontier... and on that frontier and beyond, humans and aliens alike need medical care. Enter Leonard McCoy, Doctor of Space Medicine, late of the U.S.S. Enterprise! Now delight at John Byrne's tale set in the period before Star Trek: The Motion Picture!
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Beverly Crusher

by Star Trek- Next Generation

A guide to the history that informs the world of Star Trek—just in time for the next JJ Abrams Star Trek movie

For a series set in our future, Star Trek revisits the past constantly. Kirk and Spock battle Nazis, Roman gladiators, and witness the Great Depression. When they're not doubling back on their own earlier timelines, the crew uses the holodeck to spend time in the American Old West or Victorian England. Alien races have their own complex and fascinating histories, too.

The Star Trek universe is a sci-fi imagining of a future world that is rooted in our own human history. Gene Roddenberry created a television show with a new world and new rules in order to comment on social and political issues of the 1960s, from the Vietnam War and race relations to the war on terror and women's rights. Later Star Trek series and films also grapple with the issues of their own decades: HIV, ecological threats, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and terrorism.

How did Uhura spur real-life gender and racial change in the 1960s? Is Kirk inextricably linked with the mythical Old West? What history do the Klingons share with the Soviet Union? Can Nazi Germany shed light on the history and culture of the Cardassians? Star Trek and History explains how the holodeck is as much a source for entertainment as it is a historical teaching tool, how much of the technology we enjoy today had its conceptual roots in Star Trek, and how by looking at Norse mythology we can find our very own Q.

  • Features an exclusive interview with Nichelle Nichols, the actress behind the original Lt. Uhura, conducted at the National Air and Space Museum
  • Explains the historical inspiration behind many of the show's alien races and storylines
  • Covers topics ranging from how stellar cartography dates back to Ancient Rome, Greece, and Babylonia to how our "Great Books" of western literature continue to be an important influence to Star Trek's characters of the future
  • Includes a timeline comparing the stardates of Star Trek's timeline to our own real world history

Filled with fascinating historical comparisons, Star Trek and History is an essential companion for every Star Trek fan.

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Dana Scully

by X Files

THE X-FILES lives on in this new collection that serves as a "lost" season of the smash-hit TV series. Mulder and Scully are sent to San Francisco to solve a string of murders, then become targets of the Tong underworld and travel to the mysterious Badlands to investigate a series of disappearances in this title collecting THE X-FILES #0-6.
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The Doctor (emergency Medical Hologram)

by Star Trek- Voyager

Microchips. Genetic modification of plants. Cloning. Advances in technology promise to shape our lives more profoundly than ever before. Exciting new discoveries in reproductive, genetic, and information technologies all serve to call into question the immutability of the boundaries between humans, animals, and machines. The category of the “posthuman” reflects the implications of such new technologies on contemporary culture, especially in their capacity to reconfigure the human body and to challenge our most fundamental understandings of human nature.

Elaine L. Graham explores these issues as they are expressed within popular culture and the creative arts. From the myth of Prometheus and the Gothic horror of Frankenstein’s monster to contemporary postmodern science fiction, a gallery of fantastic creatures haunts Western myth, religion, and literature. They serve to connect contemporary debates with enduring concerns about the potential—and the limits—of human creativity.

This book breaks new ground in drawing together a wide range of literature on new technologies and their ethical implications. In her explorations of the monstrous and the cyborg, Graham covers the Jewish legend of the golem, the Human Genome Project, Star Trek: Next Generation, Star Trek: Voyager, Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, Donna Haraway’s cyborg writing, and many other related topics. This book will interest students in cultural studies, literature, ethics, religion, information technology, and the life sciences.

 

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Dr. Charles Xavier

by X-men

Reading this book will make you less sure of yourself—and that’s a good thing. In The Invisible Gorilla, Christopher Chabris and Daniel Simons, creators of one of psychology’s most famous experiments, use remarkable stories and counterintuitive scientific findings to demonstrate an important truth: Our minds don’t work the way we think they do. We think we see ourselves and the world as they really are, but we’re actually missing a whole lot.
 
Chabris and Simons combine the work of other researchers with their own findings on attention, perception, memory, and reasoning to reveal how faulty intuitions often get us into trouble. In the process, they explain:
 
• Why a company would spend billions to launch a product that its own analysts know will fail
• How a police officer could run right past a brutal assault without seeing it
• Why award-winning movies are full of editing mistakes
• What criminals have in common with chess masters
• Why measles and other childhood diseases are making a comeback
• Why money managers could learn a lot from weather forecasters
 
Again and again, we think we experience and understand the world as it is, but our thoughts are beset by everyday illusions. We write traffic laws and build criminal cases on the assumption that people will notice when something unusual happens right in front of them. We’re sure we know where we were on 9/11, falsely believing that vivid memories are seared into our minds with perfect fidelity. And as a society, we spend billions on devices to train our brains because we’re continually tempted by the lure of quick fixes and effortless self-improvement.
 
The Invisible Gorilla reveals the myriad ways that our intuitions can deceive us, but it’s much more than a catalog of human failings. Chabris and Simons explain why we succumb to these everyday illusions and what we can do to inoculate ourselves against their effects. Ultimately, the book provides a kind of x-ray vision into our own minds, making it possible to pierce the veil of illusions that clouds our thoughts and to think clearly for perhaps the first time.
 


From the Hardcover edition.
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Phlox

by Star Trek- Enterprise

A must-have for fans of the hit ABC drama Revenge, this guide delves into the fast-paced world of the character-driven series and sheds light on complicated plot twists and unanswered questions. Loyal viewers will love this intelligent and insightful companion to the show, which includes an analysis of main character Emily Thorne’s master plan. The book explores themes and characters from the series as well as its soap opera, literary, and real-world inspirations.
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Dr. Zaius

by Planet Of The Apes

"Hot on the heels of BOOM!'s sold-out, best-selling Planet of the Apes ongoing series comes a brand new four-issue mini co-written and drawn by Gabriel Hardman! Best known for his series-defining work on Hulk and Agents of ATLAS, and his storyboard work on such hit films as Christopher Nolan's Inception, Hardman and writer Corinna Sara Bechko (Heathentown, Fear Itself: The Home Front) bring you Betrayal of the Planet of the Apes! Taking place during the continuity of the original seminal fan-favorite film, the feared and respected General Aleron finds himself at the center of a conspiracy that could transform ape/human relations! Aleron's journey puts him face to face with...Dr. Zaius! A not-to-be-missed mini-series with story and art that is sure to make you go...ape!"
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Stephen Franklin

by Babylon 5

The summer of 1989 was a particularly turbulent one for Walter Chaw, who found solace in a little movie about the end of the world, Steve De Jarnatt's genre-bending "Miracle Mile". Part memoir, part critical study, and featuring the participation of writer-director De Jarnatt, this monograph is an utterly unique chronicle of the Reagan era that examines how the most public of media can give meaning to the most private apocalypse.
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Dr. Christine Chapel

by Star Trek

started as a nurse, became a doctor
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Owen Harper

by Torchwood

The Second Edition of "AHistory" amends and vastly expands the work of the sold-out First Edition, continuing to incorporate the whole of Doctor Who into a single timeline. All told, this book takes nearly 800 full-length Doctor Who stories and dates them in a single chronology --- starting with the origin of the Universe and working its way forward through the various eras to the end of time. Specifically, this Second Edition covers... all Doctor Who TV episodes up through "Last of the Time Lords", the Series 3 finale; all "Doctor Who" novels from Virgin and the BBC, up through the New Series Adventure "Wooden Heart"; the Big Finish audio range up through "Frozen Time" (#98); all Torchwood Series 1 episodes and novels; the Sarah Jane Adventures pilot; all Telos novellas. In addition, this Second Edition incorporates the Doctor Who Magazine comic strip that has been running since 1979.
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