Best Artificial Intelligence Books

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The crowd-ranked version of the Best A.I. Books. See what the public ranks the list, vote on what you think should be ranked, or submit your own recommendations to the list.
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20
8
2

Robopocalypse

by Daniel H. Wilson

3.5 avg rating
John W. Campbell
21
7
2

Otherland

by Tad Williams

5 avg rating
Otherland...
Surrounded by secrecy, it is home to the wildest dreams and darkest nighmares. Incredible amounts of money have been lavished on it. The best minds of two generations have labored to build it. And somehow, bit by bit, it is claiming the Earth's most valuable resource--its children.
22
6
1

Queen Of Angels

by Greg Bear

5 avg rating
In a perfect future a famous poet commits terrible murder. WHY? That crime and that question lead a biotransformed policewoman to a jungle of torture and forgotten gods; a writer to the Bohemian shadows of a vast city; and a scientist directly into the mind - into the nightmare soul - of the psychopath himself. This is science fiction at its best: a detective story, a story of virtual reality entrapments and the coming to consciousness of an Artificial Intelligence ...
Hugo
Locus Science Fiction
John W. Campbell
23
7
2

House Of Suns

by Alastair Reynolds

3.75 avg rating
Six million years ago, at the dawn of the star-faring era, Abigail Gentian fractured herself into a thousand male and female clones, which she called shatterlings. But now, someone is eliminating the Gentian line. Campion and Purslane-two shatterlings who have fallen in love and shared forbidden experiences-must determine exactly who, or what, their enemy is, before they are wiped out of existence.

Arthur C. Clarke
24
3
0

When Harlie Was One

by David Gerrold

Nebula
Hugo
Locus Science Fiction
25
3
0
26
3
0

The Lifecycle Of Software Objects

by Ted Chiang

5 avg rating
What's the best way to create artificial intelligence? In 1950, Alan Turing wrote, 'Many people think that a very abstract activity, like the playing of chess, would be best. It can also be maintained that it is best to provide the machine with the best sense organs that money can buy, and then teach it to understand and speak English. This process could follow the normal teaching of a child. Things would be pointed out and named, etc. Again I do not know what the right answer is, but I think both approaches should be tried.'

The first approach has been tried many times in both science fiction and reality. In this new novella, at over 30,000 words, his longest work to date, Ted Chiang offers a detailed imagining of how the second approach might work within the contemporary landscape of startup companies, massively-multiplayer online gaming, and open-source software. It's a story of two people and the artificial intelligences they helped create, following them for more than a decade as they deal with the upgrades and obsolescence that are inevitable in the world of software. At the same time, it's an examination of the difference between processing power and intelligence, and of what it means to have a real relationship with an artificial entity.
27
2
0

River Of Gods

by Ian McDonald

BSFA
Hugo
Arthur C. Clarke
32
1
0

The Two Faces Of Tomorrow

by James P. Hogan

Midway through the 21st century, an integrated global computer network manages much of the world's affairs. A proposed major software upgrade - an artificial intelligence - will give the system an unprecedented degree of independent decision-making, but serious questions are raised in regard to how much control can safely be given to a non-human intelligence. In order to more fully assess the system, a new space-station habitat - a world in miniature - is developed for deployment of the fully operational system, named Spartacus. This mini-world can then be "attacked" in a series of escalating tests to assess the system's responses and capabilities. If Spartacus gets out of hand, the system can be shut down and the station destroyed... unless Spartacus decides to take matters into its own hands and take the fight to Earth.
34
1
1

Extras

by Scott Westerfeld

Locus Young Adult
35
0
0

Rule 34

by Charles Stross

Locus Science Fiction
Arthur C. Clarke
38
0
0
ITEMS 20 - 38 of 40

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3 comments
Anonymous | 2018-10-04 09:59:20
That book is clearly mentioned on the cover that it is just an artificial book of the intelligence so don’t be taking this one seriously. Intelligence agency will never approached this book on https://www.topdissertations.org/wordsdoctorate-review/ website some rules of the books and intelligence are the criteria of the inventions.
Anonymous | 2018-08-22 04:54:37
I discovered this is an instructive and fascinating post so i suspect as much it is extremely valuable and proficient. I might want to thank you for the endeavors you have made in composing this article hotmail sign in
Anonymous | 2015-04-23 03:30:47
A classic; sassy, fast, funny and smart.

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