Artificial Intelligence

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Fiction in which an artificial intelligence is a major feature of the story

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Foundation Trilogy

by Isaac Asimov

4.25 avg rating
A beautiful omnibus edition hardcover, with bound in ribbon marker and gilt edges, including the complete Foundation novels by the Good Doctor: Foundation, Foundation and Empire, and Second Foundation. Cover illustration by Michael Whelan. Cover design by Rebecca Lysen and Karl Westerberg. Book design by Karin Batten. Striking endpaper Galaxy photograph courtesy of NASA. 747 pages plus a half-page About the Author. ISBN 978-0-307-29206-3. A landmark of science fiction's "Golden Age," Isaac Asimov's Foundation Trilogy-which comprises the novels Foundation, Foundation and Empire, and Second Foundation-has long been regarded a visionary masterpiece whose astonishing historical scope perfectly conveys science fiction's sense of wonder. First published as a cycle of stories in the 1940s and '50s, Asimov's iconic trilogy has endured to become, like the author himself, a legend of science fiction. Set in the far future, Foundation envisions a Galactic Empire that has thrived for 12,000 years, but whose decline into an age of barbarism lasting some thirty millennia is imminent-if the predictions of renegade psycho-historian Hari Seldon are accurate. Hoping to shorten the interval of this impending new Dark Age, Seldon convinces the Empire's Commission of Public Safety to allow him enact a diversionary plan-one full of surprising subterfugres and intrigues intended to create and protect a Foundation on which the future Empire will be erected. Foundation and Empire advances the story farther into the future, in which a technologically advanced Foundation.
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Tet Offensive

by James S Robbins

Most of what Americans have heard about the Tet Offensive is wrong. The brief battles in early 1968 during the Vietnam conflict marked the dividing line between gradual progress toward possible victory and slow descent to a humiliating defeat. That the enemy was handily defeated on the ground was considered immaterial; that it could mount attacks at all was deemed a military triumph for the Communists. This persistent view of Tet is a defeatist story line that continues to inspire America’s foreign enemies and its domestic critics of the use of force abroad.

In This Time We Win, James S. Robbins at last provides an antidote to the flawed Tet mythology still shaping the perceptions of American military conflicts against unconventional enemies and haunting our troops in combat. In his re-examination of the Tet Offensive, Robbins analyzes the Tet battles and their impact through the themes of terrorism, war crimes, intelligence failure, troop surges, leadership breakdown, and media bias. The result is an explosion of the conventional wisdom about this infamous surge, one that offers real lessons for today’s unconventional wars. Without a clear understanding of these lessons, we will find ourselves refighting the Tet Offensive again and again.
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Artificial Intelligence

by Jeff Heaton

Nature can be a great source of inspiration for artificial intelligence algorithms because its technology is considerably more advanced than our own. Among its wonders are strong AI, nanotechnology, and advanced robotics. Nature can therefore serve as a guide for real-life problem solving. In this book, you will encounter algorithms influenced by ants, bees, genomes, birds, and cells that provide practical methods for many types of AI situations. Although nature is the muse behind the methods, we are not duplicating its exact processes. The complex behaviors in nature merely provide inspiration in our quest to gain new insights about data. Artificial Intelligence for Humans is a book series meant to teach AI to those readers who lack an extensive mathematical background. The reader only needs knowledge of basic college algebra and computer programming. Additional topics are thoroughly explained. Every chapter also includes a programming example. Examples are currently provided in Java, C#, and Python. Other languages are planned. No knowledge of biology is needed to read this book. With a forward by Dave Snell.
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I Robot

by Isaac Asimov

The three laws of Robotics:
1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm
2) A robot must obey orders givein to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

With these three, simple directives, Isaac Asimov changed our perception of robots forever when he formulated the laws governing their behavior. In I, Robot, Asimov chronicles the development of the robot through a series of interlinked stories: from its primitive origins in the present to its ultimate perfection in the not-so-distant future--a future in which humanity itself may be rendered obsolete.

Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world--all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asmiov's trademark.
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Ex Machina

by Brian K. Vaughan

Award-winning writer Brian K. Vaughan (PRIDE OF BAGHDAD, Y: THE LAST MAN) uniquely combines big city politics and superheroes in this criticially acclaimed series. Set in our modern-day world, EX MACHINA tells the story of civil engineer Mitchell Hundred, who becomes America's first living, breathing super-hero after a strange accident gives him the power to communicate with machines. Eventually Mitchell tires of risking his life merely to maintain the status quo, retires from masked crime fighting and runs for mayor of New York City, winning by a landslide after the events of 9/11.

Illustrated by Tony Harris, EX MACHINA BOOK ONE is the first chapter of one of the finest series ever from Vertigo.

Collects issues #1-11.
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Mind

by Arthur Chausmer

This is meant to be a work of fiction describing the development and consequences of a self aware computer program, essentially a new life form. While it is clearly fiction, much of it is drawn from real life. There is, however, no valid reason that the basic premise of the story could not be true today. For this reason, the author does not refer to it as “science fiction” although much of it is clearly based in science and it is fiction as written. It is meant to be as accurate as possible and reflect the real world. In that, it is the author's hope that you are, perhaps for several reasons, a bit discomforted by it.
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