What SF book are you currently reading? (2015-16)

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by TomTB, Apr 24, 2015.

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  1. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I hadn't made much headway with Kostick's Edda since I got caught up with Austen, and now I'm also going to start Herman Hesse's last effort (his only work of science fiction) The Glass Bead Game, aka Magister Ludi.
     
  2. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I've put The Glass Bead Game on hold and am reading The Doomsday Book by Connie Willis (100+ pages in). It's turned out to be more tension filled than I expected.
     
  3. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    The sequel to The Lazarus War: Artefact, titled The Lazarus War: Legion, dropped today and I'm dropping everything to read it. It will be that good, because the first book, a debut by Jamie Sawyer, was spectacular.
     
  4. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Finished Connie Willis' Doomsday Book some days ago. Will now try to finish off the last instalment of Kostick's Avatar Chronicles trilogy before continuing with Hesse.
     
  5. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Started The Weak and the Innocent, the latest book in the Frontiers Saga by Ryk Brown. This series is heads and shoulders above the numerous ongoing military sci-fi series, with the exceptions of Sara King's The Legend of Zero series and the Koban series by Stephen W. Bennett.
     
  6. btkong

    btkong Administrator Staff Member

    I've been reading:

    Finished Ryk Brown's The Frontier Saga. Very good, powered through 13 books! If you like space opera, space battles, and big time underdog fights against overwhelmingly powerful enemies, it's a good one

    BV Larson's Star Force series. Book 1 done, but not bad so far.

    Finished BV Larson's Undying Mercenaries. Pulpy, heroic military science fiction, but a lot of battles and fighting. Enjoyed it a lot. Reminded me a less technical, more pulpy version of Terms of Enlistment or Old Man's War
     
  7. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Haven't read any SF in what seems like an eternity. I'm feeling a bit fantasy'd out, so imagine I'll go on a SF binge one day soon. The Frontier Saga sounds pretty awesome and I own the first couple, so might start with them. Maybe.
     
  8. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I started Kim Stanley Robinson's 2312 last night before falling asleep...not because it was boring, but because I was extremely tired. Those first pages I read before falling asleep were wonderfully described - descriptions of an unbelievably harsh (and sublime) environment via both scientific and figurative language, and so fluidly narrated so as to be instilled with a poetic flavour.
     
  9. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    I started The End of the World Running Club by Adrian Walker this morning .. another post-apocalyptic novel to go with the others I've read recently.
     
  10. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Also rereading Banks' The Player of Games.
     
  11. btkong

    btkong Administrator Staff Member

    Reading and absolutely loving the Jon and Lobo series by Mark L Van Name -- it's some dark, gritty Cyberpunk in the vein of Morgan's Altered Carbon.

    If you like BV Larson's Undying Mercenaries or Morgan's Altered Carbon, you'll definitely like it, though is far more in the vein of Morgan's darkly awesome work than Larson's more pulpy series.
     
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  12. Sir Arthur

    Sir Arthur Full Member

    Me Too. I'm halfway through, and completely immersed.
     
  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I'm done with the book. I was trying to read a little of both Stanley's 2312 and Banks' TPoG every day, but I got completely sucked into TPoG. It's such a brilliant little book. There's a TPoG thread for Banks - would love to hear your thoughts on it so far.
     
  14. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Looks fun and I've bookmarked it for future acquisition. Thanks.
     
  15. Derk of Derkholm

    Derk of Derkholm Full Member

    Will start the Miles Vorkosigan saga soon, as I recently read Lois McMaster Bujold's first two Chalion books and liked them a lot. (They somehow reminded me a lot of the "Farseer" series, which is another of my favourites).
     
  16. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Which one are you going to start with? I read the first three (as they were published, not by internal chronological order) last year and I honestly wasn't much impressed with them. I read "Curse of Chalion" years ago and thought it was excellent. BUT, I'm going to continue reading the Vorkosigan series since I'm sure they get better. I already know Bujold can write very well (based on her fantasy), and the crazy love that the Vorkosigan books get must mean something.
     
  17. Derk of Derkholm

    Derk of Derkholm Full Member

    Hi Boreas,

    I have started with "Warriors Apprentice", which should be book #2, but was suggested as starting point in this here forum.
    So far, I find it quite enjoyable and funny, although I have not yet come very far (25 %)

    Funny, I read Altered Carbon, and while I found the concept interesting, I somehow did not end up liking it enough to continue with the series.

    Why? Well, if, in the future, human bodies are just hardware to be discarded and re-engineered, to download the latest version of your memories/personality as operating system, then WHY BOTHER at all?

    How can you really kill anybody? What happens if you die? What is the meaning of life? Somehow, the very idea of ongoing, eternal life seems to take the whole struggle out of it, which - to me - made it definitely less interesting.


    Best regards,
    Andy
     
  18. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    This is the same book that I started with years and years ago and got bored with. Last year, I started with Bujold's first published Vorkosigan novel, Shards of Honor, which I found enjoyable, though I think the 10 page epilogue was better (more moving) than the entire novel that preceded it. I then read The Warrior's Apprentice and again got stuck - when Miles is trying to hurriedly procure that ship and crew with his sneaky dealings. I came back to it after about a month and finally finished it. I found it a little too farcical for most of the story - I don't know if Bujold was purposefully making fun of all those space opera tropes or whether I was supposed to take it more seriously. For me, the novel picked up only towards the end. And Miles' political dealings back on his home planet was the part I enjoyed most. So far, I've found Miles a little too clever for his own good and the serendipitous outcomes to his various situations seemed a little...too improbable to be believed. I'd be happier knowing if Bujold did intend the book as a farce. The next book I read was Ethan of Athos. I found its pacing problematic, but it was short and a curious enough read to keep my interest.
     
  19. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I've also started Christopher Nuttall's second instalment in his military sf Ark Royal series, The Nelson Touch. I read the first instalment in December of 2014, but the story is light and easy, so it's been no problem to get back into it.
     
  20. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    I'm around 70% into this now, and I'm not sure if I'm enjoying it or not. Hopefully the ending will sway me one way or another ..
     
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