Upcoming Film & TV

Discussion in 'Film & TV' started by Boreas, May 14, 2015.

  1. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    "Childhood's End" by Arthur C. Clarke will be adapted by Mathew Graham for Syfy into a TV mini series. December, 2015, projected screening. Mathew Graham also did "Life on Mars", which I really enjoyed.

    http://www.syfy.com/childhoodsend
     
  2. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Meh. Read the excellent book.

     
  3. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

  4. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

  5. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Last edited: Jul 11, 2015
  6. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Okay, I just checked and it seems that the Shannara stories are in fact post-apocalyptic where science comes more and more to the forefront in later series. Had no idea. Anybody read the books and/or is excited to see the TV adaptation in January, 2016?
     
  7. ofer

    ofer Regular Member

    I read the original trilogy several years ago. It's implied that the Shannara world was an advanced one once and had an apocalyptic event in the past, although it doesn't specifically said that it's Earth. Amazingly, that apocalyptic event brought the world to the almost exact state of Tolkien's Middle Earth. What are the odds? :rolleyes: I don't recall anything science-related in the books, but maybe there was something in the latter books which I didn't read.

    I wasn't really impressed by the books - they weren't terrible but they weren't very good either - and as you said, they were simply Tolkien derivatives. Maybe it's the sort of book that you have to read when you're very young and didn't read a lot of fantasy in order to like. I managed to finish the trilogy, but have no intention on reading any of the other Shannara books.
     
  8. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Yeah, I'm still not interested in the books and only marginally interested in the upcoming show. I was just surprised by that image of the aircraft carrier.

    Also, the new comic-con trailer for Batman vs. Superman. I did not like Snyder's adaptations of 300 and Watchmen and Superman (the only Snyder film I liked was his Dawn of the Dead remake). So, this is another feature that I thought would probably suck, but damn, the trailer actually makes it look much better than my initial expectations. I'm looking forward to as epic a confrontation as in Miller's The Dark Knight Returns. Anyone one else looking forward to this?

     
  9. Alicia

    Alicia Well-Known Member

  10. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I wasn't enamoured with "American Gods", either, and I'm a Neil Gaiman fan. That said, I read the first edition of the novel, before the unedited/expanded version was released. At some point I'll have to read that and see whether my opinion changes.
     
  11. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Batman: The Killing Joke is going to be released as an animated movie by DC. Really looking forward to it. It's one of the best Batman one-shot graphic novels ever written (by Alan Moore and art by Brian Bolland) that delves into the psychotic mind of the Joker whilst paralleling Batman's own warped psyche to some degree. The only other psychologically unnerving story [that reached a similar level of depth] was Batman: Arkaham Asylum, which featured a whole host of other insane inmates besides the Joker (by Alan Grant and featuring Dave McKean's surreal art which emphasised the disturbing psychotic nature of the story).

    If you haven't already seen the two Batman stories by Frank Miller (both classics and required reading) that DC animated, then I really recommend you give them a go.

    Batman: Year One was Frank Miller's (writer) and David Mazzucchelli's (artist) update of Batman's origin story and what a perfect update it was. The story eschews superhero aspects and concentrates on the rampant crime in Gotham City from two perspectives. One is a newly arrived detective navigating the fine line between duty and the constant pressure of corruption that demands his complicity. The other is the return of a prodigal son after a decade-long absence, exploring incognito the crime-ridden streets of Gotham to detrimental effect and seeking ways outside of 'the law' to combat the problems on display. Collected graphic novel and animated feature.

    Batman: The Dark Knight Returns by Frank Miller (writer & illustrator), Klaus Janson (inker) and Lynn Varley (colourist) is a superbly dark, ultra dystopian near future tale where a retired and intensely bitter Bruce Wayne (in his mid-to-late 50s?) complacently ekes out his remaining days fueled by alcohol. Not just Gotham City, but the entire US has gone to pot - a more and more totalitarian government, unheard of levels of crime and violence in Gotham City, superheroes outlawed, rising tensions in the Cold War with Russia, etc. Batman returns, but it is a much more violent version and, like an outlaw of ye olde wild west, is public enemy number one. The libertarian leanings of Miller are evident and he uses the prominence of talk shows in the 1980's to satirise politics and political correctness. Also contains the best ever confrontation between Batman and Superman, which the new B v. S movie will most probably incorporate. Collected graphic novel and animated feature: part 1 and part 2.

    Both are animated in the same style of the original comics. None of these stories were kid-friendly when they were first published during the late 1980's. They were much too dark and complex and were at the forefront of mainstream comics gaining acceptance in the media as a relevant art form. The three works that really spearheaded this move into mainstream acceptance were Art Spiegleman's Maus, Alan Moore's The Watchmen and Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2015
  12. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I have been waiting for this film for many months and it's finally going to début at the Toronto Film Festival on September 12th! Hardcore by Ilya Naishuller. Just waiting till it's out on DVD, or I'll most likely see this film at the theatres if it plays near where I am (I hope). It's a small, low-budget, independent film, but I have a feeling it's going to be a hit!

    Trailer and other information: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/hardcore-the-first-ever-action-pov-feature-film#/story

    Toronto Film Festival line-up: http://www.ew.com/article/2015/08/1...al-announces-midnight-docs-and-vanguard-slate
     
    ofer likes this.
  13. ofer

    ofer Regular Member

    About time! I've been salivating about this movie ever since you posted about it half a year ago.

    I just know it will be either one of the greatest or one of the dumbest movies I saw in recent years. Crossing my fingers for the first option...Grenade them, Laddie! :)
     
    Boreas likes this.
  14. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I'm hoping it'll be the bomb! The only problem is that I don't think this feature will get a wide release. If so, then it'll be a longer wait till it's available to watch online or on a DVD. "If you can hear them, but you can't shoot them, you can probably grenade them. Drop an egg down there, Laddie." Epic line with that Colonial English accent.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2015
  15. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    BBC to adapt China Miéville's The City and the City in a 4-part miniseries. Excellent novel and I'm looking forward to this adaptation! This is a novel that can be viewed either as fantasy or science fiction (I wouldn't call it a science-fantasy) though I believe it's usually classified as science fiction. One of the most unique books I've read in recent years and well deserving of the accolades its received.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2015
  16. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So, I just found out that Netflix has been working on a Marvel TV show and it's going to feature Jessica Jones. This is interesting, because I read all the comics by Brian Michael Bendis and really, really liked them (brilliant dialogue from Bendis, as always!), but they were definitely NOT for kids. In my mind, any screen adaptation of Jessica Jones should be an 'R-rated', HBO-like show. I really don't think Netflix will go in that direction. It's curious that Marvel is suddenly bringing out its B-list characters for the screen. Anyone know more about this or read the excellent Bendis comics?

    Supposedly to air in November of this year.

    http://www.cinemablend.com/television/Jessica-Jones-What-We-Know-So-Far-70065.html
     
  17. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

  18. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So, the AMC Preacher trailer is finally up. I'm looking forward to it. Weird that they would call the comic a 'cult hit' - it was so huge that it was one of DC's biggest sellers. Garth Ennis was always a great writer, but this series put him on the map. The comic definitely pushed boundaries and was never for the easily offended.



    BUT...there seem to be a lot of changes with the TV adaptation:

     
  19. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials is being adapted for television by the BBC. I have never read the trilogy, even though I bought the paperbacks sometime in the mid-2000s (they're still lying unread). The more time has passed, the less inclined I've been to pick them up. So, perhaps I'll wait for the BBC adaptation, unless someone here highly recommends that I absolutely must read it beforehand.
     
  20. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

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