The Last Movie You Saw

Discussion in 'Film & TV' started by Boreas, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I just re-watched Rogue One.
     
  2. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Just watched The Hunted (2003) by William Friedkin last night. I decided to watch it on recommendation. When I looked it up, I saw that it was unfavourably received by the critics for the most part, but it turned out to be great! Tommy Lee Jones is the tracker who's recruited to help hunt down Benicio del Toro, a man trained as an expert tracker/efficient killer for the military by Jones. This film is not about intimate characterisations; rather, it focuses on the framework and processes of the hunt. Some great action scenes, restrained acting and portrayals of characters, and two excellent military-styled fighting sequences sans flamboyance. I'll recommend this to anyone who likes a good, back-to-basics action-thriller. A-
     
  3. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Rewatched four action-fueled films: First Blood (1982), Die hard (1988), Aliens (1986) and Edge of Tomorrow (2014).

    All great fun. While some of the action in First Blood feels a little dated now, I had forgotten how good Stallone's abrupt and dramatic psychological breakdown is right at the end. That ending is probably one of the few times he's done some bona fide acting. Die Hard is your standard action film. Aliens is, of course, fantastic as always. And Edge of Tomorrow keeps getting better with every viewing (my third) despite the plot-contrivance at the very end. I'm really looking forward to the sequel and keeping my fingers crossed that it's even better than the first. In my opinion, EoT is one of the best book-to-film SF adaptations I've seen since Robert Wise's The Andromeda Strain (1971) and Peter Hyams' 2010: The Year We Make Contact (1984). However, while Wise's and Hyams' adaptations follow the minutiae of their source material very carefully, Liman's adaptation is very different in tone, mood and detail whilst keeping the basic skeleton of the plot. For a Japanese story completely adapted for a western audience, it is an A.
     
  4. Tiran

    Tiran Well-Known Member

    I thought The Martian was also pretty darn faithful to the book. As was 300 and Sin City.
     
  5. Jim Johanson

    Jim Johanson Full Member

    Hush was pretty good. I'm normally not into 'slasher' type stuff, but it's an interesting spin on the "someone is trying to get into my house and kill me" trope, and it's not a gross-out gore fest. Would recommend.
     
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  6. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    The Martian was for the most part, except for the final rescue when the female captain decided to do the EVA instead of the individual whose primary expertise was exactly such EVA manoeuvring. Thought that was extremely Hollywood-stupid and un-astronaut-like. Besides, I did not really like the book nor the film. Sin City adaptation was top-notch, and I say that as previously having been a near-rabid Frank Miller fan. 300, however, sucked ass. I think keeping faith with the style of the comic in this visual adaptation just didn't work, and neither did the introduction of the extra plot element back in Sparta add anything.
     
  7. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Thanks for the recommendation, and welcome to the forum!
     
  8. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I like this movie:

     
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  9. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Have you watched Bright by D. Ayer?
    I have and I found it very cliche, not particularly funny and somewhat predictable.
    Special effects were good, but beyond that, I would have liked it to focus more on the orcs and elves and less on Will Smith's personality.

     
  10. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I have seen it. I thought it was OK but my wife loved it.
     
  11. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I saw a fantastic noir crime thriller film yesterday. Drive (2011) by Nicolas Winding Refn. I had vaguely heard of this as a good film and thought it would have lots of driving action sequences. It had couple of such short scenes, but it was actually a slower-paced thriller. And I believe it was the first time I had seen a film with Ryan Gosling in it. Now, I had the superficial impression of Gosling as a romantic lead in films. At least, that's how he'd somehow ended up getting typecast in my mind. I also know he's in Blade Runner 2049. For some reason, I always classed him together with Ryan Reynolds, whom I really don't like, but Holy Cow! Gosling was absolutely great in this film. I loved Refn's direction, loved the colours and atmosphere of Los Angles evenings (if it were high-tech, it could have been a cyberpunk noir film), and loved the story stripped of dialogue to its minimum. And I particularly loved how simple the story was - no twists, no gimmicks, just as simple as can be. There was a wonderful juxtaposition of tender-heartedness with necessary ruthlessness in Gosling's portrayal of his character, and which somehow also seemed to spillover into the overall stark atmosphere of the film. Good acting from all the principals. Also some unexpectedly hard but short bursts of violence. A solid A from me, and a great crime film. I even feel like picking up the book it's based on.

    Edit: Also, as I checked Refn's filmoagraphy, I find he directed another film that was a surprise hit for me some years back: Valhalla Rising (2009). I didn't follow through at the time to see what else the director had done, but I'll be checking out more of his features now. There's definitely a similarity between these two features - the slow pace, the camera shots, absolutely minimal dialogue, etc.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
  12. Jim Johanson

    Jim Johanson Full Member

    Just watched The Void (2017). The practical effects were spectacular, and it's so rare to see movies still using practical effects rather than just computer animating everything. That being said, it would have been nice if the practical effects had the tiniest semblance of a plot behind them. It feels like a group of really talented special effects guys decided to make a movie, so they asked a guy from a community college writing I course to come up with a plot and gave him a day to do it. Lots of untapped potential here.
     
  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Finally saw the famous Death Wish (1974) directed by Brian Garfield and starring Charles Bronson. Was very surprised at the extremely brutal violence of that first major scene. Overall, I really liked the whole feature despite its glorification of vigilantism. The film supposedly delivers the opposite message from the book it's based on, which denounces such action (the author criticised the film for this deviation). I've made a note to seek out the book at some point. Charles Bronson plays a 'bleeding heart' liberal and an architect, a conscientious objector of the Korean War (ended up being a CO of a medical unit), and how he slowly succumbs to the notion of taking justice into his own hands in a crime-infested NYC after his wife is killed and daughter left comatose from the trauma of assault. Film was received very negatively by critics for its message but embraced by the audience. This film spawned a few sequels, all of which are supposed to be a lot more generic and exploitative action features.

    It reminded me a little of another vigilante film I liked from circa ten years ago starring Jodie Foster, The Brave One. It's very similar in that an everyday civilian resorts to justice outside the law, not individuals with former experience such as ex-cops, criminals, army vets, etc. Okay, Charles Bronson's character was technically an army veteran, but not really a soldier. Neither of the films are flashy.
     
  14. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I watched this over the weekend:

     
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  15. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    And? Any good?
     
  16. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    It was good but there is a rape scene. I hate those. But that is why they make the >> button, I guess.
     
  17. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Saw Frank Darabont's horror-SF film, The Mist (2007), which was based on a Stephen King story. Pretty standard set-up in terms of plot devices - minimum explanation of the threat, group of people holed up together with one sane faction and one increasingly insane - but I thought it was actually rather good. It's a low budget film, and I went into it thinking it would be a little cheesy, but it really wasn't. Darker than I expected. If anyone's in the mood for what's become a bit of a cliché in horror-SF but still handled pretty well, then give it a go. The premise is like that of Stranger Things, but of course the story is from 1980.
     
  18. Jim Johanson

    Jim Johanson Full Member

    The Ritual was really good. Digs into witchcraft with a Nordic spin. Great acting and creature design. Recommended.
     
  19. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I have watched Annihilation. I quite liked it. Visually it is clever. The traditional plot of an expedition setting into the unknown without much hope of returning is hardly new. However, Annihilation is not a horror film riding on an adventurous race as I was expecting, but rather a well developed psychological thriller with a Science Fiction background. It very lightly touches on the premise of O. Butler's Lilith's Brood books:
    . the creation of new species by altering, tainting our world as we know it. Should we fight it or embrace it?
     
  20. ofer

    ofer Regular Member

    It was a nice enough movie. Good atmosphere and writing (don't know if the movie follows the book or not since I never read it). Both lead actresses are among my favorites - especially Jennifer Jason Leigh since her unforgettable performance in eXistenZ.

    Ending was slightly disappointing as it wasn't clear
    how exactly did Portman destroy the alien? just set fire to it? how come she succeded when all those storm troopers who came before her failed? Something didn't make sense here

    @Diziet Sma if you didn't watch Garland's previous movie (Ex Machina) I highly recommend it.
     

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