The Last Movie You Saw

Discussion in 'Film & TV' started by Boreas, Jul 3, 2015.

  1. Jack Brewhouse

    Jack Brewhouse Well-Known Member

    I couldn’t get more than 20 minutes into that. It was so bad! Not my cup of tea at all. That may seem on odd thing for me to say when I've got 'Dracula AD1972' lined up for this evening. Please don't judge me, I was once like you!
     
  2. Tiran

    Tiran Well-Known Member

    I agree that the Iron Man connection watered down Peter Parker's genius, but I did enjoy actor's portrayal and the pacing/action in the film. The art of the film was better than the "bones", as it were. I think it is the best of the Spider Man films, and one of the better Marvel Universe films to date - but most are pretty lackluster.

    BTW - Marisa Tomei is 52 - an appropriate age for the aunt of a high school student. It isn't her fault she's holding up so well.


    I made the trip to the theater to see Bladerunner 2049 last week. I don't think the re-immersion in that world could ever be as impactful as the original, but the sequel was excellent all the way through and avoided being at all hockey. Ford brought his A game. None of the action went too far, the relationship with the hollowgram was presented in this elusive way that keeps you guessing as it puzzles K, while furthering the contemplation about memory and free will started in the first film. Overall, every touch was very "human".

    One of the most technically impressive things was the CGI Rachel. Unlike the rubbery CGI Moff Tarkin and Leia in Rogue One, "Rachel" is a completely believable human being. She looked like Sean Young's twin sister, rather than an animated person. Looking fully human but not identical actually fit the story well.
     
  3. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

  4. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I went with my daughter to watch Paddington 2. I have a confession: I loved it. It is one of these films you take your child out of love, anticipating a torturous two hours experience, and you find yourself, suddenly, laughing along.
    Hugh Grant as Phoenix Buchanan and Brendan Gleeson as Knuckles McGinty were fantastic.
    And great publicity to visit London too; I'm glad I'll be there in a few weeks.
     
    TomTB likes this.
  5. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Two nights ago, I re-watched the neo-noir crime thriller Ronin (1998) directed by John Frankenheimer. Still enjoyed it, and it has some of the best filmed car chases. What I love about it is how little of the overall plot is explained. It's a brief snapshot of much larger political goings-on, but where the perspective is at the lowest of street levels, and where the ramifications of what occurs can be felt on more general, wider political arenas. All you know is that individual mercenaries (all of them ex-special operatives) have been hired to acquire a case that is in transit in France. Very professional, subdued depictions of the individuals, nothing flashy at all. The plot is fluid, where the stage for the ambush is not fixed and so plans must necessarily remain malleable and subject to improvisation, and this uncertainty is further compounded by shifting alliances and double crosses. Very good. This film and the other neo-noir crime thiller, Heat (1995), by Michael Mann are probably the last two really good films with Robert DeNiro. And Heat is particularly excellent, far more intimate and dramatic than Ronin.

    I can understand why people might have a hard time getting into it. The two leads were abominably miscast. Still, it's a popcorn fest of special effects and world-building, and I enjoyed all those parts of it.
     
  6. Tiran

    Tiran Well-Known Member

    Big fan of Ronin. It is so understated in depicting "professionals" at work. Soderberg's Haywire has some of that feel, too.
     
  7. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

  8. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    This video is not available in Switzerland... Mmm, is Uncle Buck that dodgy...?:p
     
    Safari Bob likes this.
  9. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Last night, I watched one of the best new films I've seen in recent years: Dunkirk by Christopher Nolan. His best since 2006's The Prestige and probably his best overall. Wonderful, wonderful visuals, changes in perspectives, simultaneous and desperate struggles for survival, fear, subdued courage, and a simple act of kindness done by a young adult that bespeaks a level of understanding and wisdom beyond his years. All told with an economy of dialogue. Best war film I'm seen in a long, long time. The film, especially given its effective soundtrack, grips from the first moment, and one can't help but be moved by its end. 5/5
     
    Last edited: Dec 13, 2017
  10. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I watched it last summer, and I thought it was brilliant too. Did you watch it in a movie theatre? Its sound effects and photography were incredibly impacting. This is one film that manages to wrap and belittle the spectator with its magnitude.
     
    Boreas likes this.
  11. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    A friend of mine had the Blue-ray DVD. Everything about this film was top-notch! Photography, soundtrack, pacing, perspectives, tone and atmosphere, the desperation for survival yet with that inherent Britishness of orderly queuing. This was NOT in the vein of your standard "war is hell" films, and I liked it all the better for it. I'm probably going to re-watch it again soon. It might become one of my favourite war films alongside Patton, Paths of Glory, Dr. Strangelove, Apocalypse Now, Bridge on the River Kwai and Lawrence of Arabia.
     
  12. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    If you ever have a chance to watch it again on a big screen, take it. You will like it even more.

    War films I like besides your suggestions of Apocalypse Now and Bridge on the River Kwai are
    Rome Open City, Paisan and Germany, Year Zero, a trilogy by R Rossellini.

    Also, The Deer Hunter and Band of Brothers (miniseries)
     
  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I watched two naval films the last couple of weeks, and I enjoyed both.

    The Final Countdown (1980) directed by Don Taylor is an alternate history/time travel SF film where a U.S. supercarrier is whisked away to December 6th, 1942. It's most impressive for those technology sequences that were filmed on the actual USS Nimitz, and for the aircraft sequences showcasing manoeuvres also on the z-axis rather than just on the x-y-planes like what's usual in other films.

    And I just finished watching a mindless military-action "sci-fi" invasion film based on a board-game and with all kinds of plot-holes, but which I nevertheless thoroughly enjoyed: Battleship (2012) directed by Peter Berg. Seriously fun with a great rock n' roll soundtrack, lots of great explosions and a couple of fun lines of dialogue. While the working of the ships was impressive, the depiction of personnel was definitely more Hollywood affected compared to The Final Countdown, where crew interaction and behaviour was shown much more realistically and with more detachment.

    The Deer Hunter is also a great film. I'm always reminded of the civilian half of the film whenever I read about Gurgeh's life on Chiark Orbital before he heads off to Azad. Band of Brothers I need to finish watching. I did see a few episodes many years ago but didn't get the chance to finish the series.

    Thanks, will look up Haywire.
     
  14. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    Tora! Tora! Tora! rocks and I also enjoy The Battle of Midway.
     
  15. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I just finished watching Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003) by Peter Weir. I had seen the film when it first came out and remember enjoying it, but I realised I'd forgotten most of the details except for the basic plot. Not sure if it's because I'm currently reading Patrick O'Brian, but this time around, I absolutely loved the film. It is a rousing and epic naval adventure - at times even swashbuckling - that doesn't lose sight of the human touch. Absolutely marvellous script, intelligent and constrained depiction of life on a little wooden boat in that vast ocean against a superior 'prey', and a faithful representation of the opposite personalities that is the focus of the novels. Aubrey: jocular, with rough charm, realist and man of action. Maturin: more taciturn, very pensive, intellectual, and equally cool and tough under pressure with respect to his profession as Aubrey is to his. In the novels, their extremely strong friendship is also characterised by an underlying philosophical conflict, and they represent two facets of human nature at odds in an unnatural environment for man. Obviously, screen adaptations can never wholly capture such nuances from their written source, but this film made a more than admirable effort and succeeded quite well. Jack Russell really is a very good Aubrey. And while Paul Bettany does do a fair Maturin, I'm not sure he was as successful in his role as Russell was in his. In the novels, Maturin does also have a lighter side, and this was missing from the film. To be fair, Maturin's character is more difficult to play. Wonderful action - only two but very brutal engagements during the whole film - sustained tension, good pacing, and a brilliantly filmed chase around Cape Horn. The film strikes an excellent balance between the gravity of the situations in which the crew find themselves whilst maintaining a similar light-heartedness with which the novels are suffused. It shows men able to live life in the moment, where an extra ration of grog is counted as a pretty reward for a job well done. There is no other alternative to living at sea. The acting is fluid and measured, not at all melodramatic or saccharine at any moment. Within the framework of an action-adventure, there is good depth. Loved it, and it's a 5/5 or an A from me.
     
    Diziet Sma likes this.
  16. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Saw two films. First was Atomic Blonde (2017) by David Leitch. I was told it was an action film, and while it does have some great action - albeit ultimately unrealistic given that Charlize Theron faces off against men double or even triple her weight, and in one instance simultaneously - it is an essence a noir espionage film taking place in Berlin days or weeks before the Wall was to come down. It is beautifully shot, I loved the vivid neon colours and plays on lighting, I loved the quintessential 80's soundtrack, and Theron's performance was quite magnetic. But the staggered plot leaves much to be desired. And while the ultimate revelation might take you by surprise, it's easy to predict the penultimate reveal. C+ grade from me.

    Second film was the new Stephen King adaptation of It (2017) by Andy Muschietti. And what can I say other than it was great fun! It's standard horror fare, but really well done. The pacing is great, and each child is given adequate treatment to bring out their peculiarities yet also make them function as a cohesive group. Parts of it are downright creepy, and I kept telling myself, "nooo, don't go there, don't open that door you idiot, don't follow the egg trail like a moron..." Bill Skarsgård does an especially great job as Pennywise the Clown. B+ for the thrills and for the nostalgic chance to vicariously overcome fears.
     
  17. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I have also watched It and liked it. I went along without too high expectations, and it was entertaining. It made me jump a couple of times.

    Have any of you seen 1922 directed by Zak Hilditch? It is an adaption of Stephen King's novel 1922.
    I liked it. Do not watch it if you have an aversion to rats, big or small.

    I have almost completed Mars. It is a six-part miniseries produced by National Geographic and based on the book How We'll Live on Mars by Stephen Petranek.
    It mixes elements of real interviews with a fictional story of a group of astronauts as they land on the planet Mars. The story alternates between the years 2016, 2033 and 2037.
    I'm loving it so far.
     
    Boreas likes this.
  18. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Nope, never seen it. I've seen 2004 TV adaptation of his Salem's Lot, and that was pretty good.
     
  19. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Yeah! It's this time of the year to watch Love Actually again!!!:p
    Happy Holiday to everyone wherever you might be!

     
  20. Tiran

    Tiran Well-Known Member

    My favorite holiday film is "Home for the Holidays" with Holly Hunter. Really brings the nightmare of family.
     

Share This Page