SF/F Reading in September 2017

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by Diziet Sma, Sep 1, 2017.

  1. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Science fiction by definition requires a lot of suspension of disbelief. But predicating a book's premise upon a civilization's most important custom being endangering and winnowing out their greatest resource, their children, is just absurd. The entire civilization exists in a tin can so it doesn't have young ones to spare. A fist size meteor at any time makes them all go poof. It's a ship. One ship. The loss of even one youngster could be the fatal blow that leads to extinction.

    Capiche?
     
  2. hrafnwasser

    hrafnwasser Well-Known Member

    Throwing the dice of outrageous chance - Volume 3 next, @TomTB ???

    I looked at Panshin's Rite of Passage and I've decided that - agreeing with @kenubrion - I'll not be buying it. Not sure I can go with the premise. It might represent an early iteration of the this theme, but it's a well used trope by now.

    Sorry people.
     
  3. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I still haven't made much headway with Rite of Passage, because I've been glued to the Star Wars expanded universe all week. Finished off Heir to the Empire and Dark Force Rising by Timothy Zahn and am now on The Last Command. I definitely want to continue with RoP - read the first two chapters a week ago and thought it started off great, and unlike some of the other comments above, I don't see what the problem with the premise is - but I don't think I'll be able to get to it until I've satisfied my current need for Star Wars nostalgia by binge reading this trilogy...for now.
     
  4. R-Hat

    R-Hat Well-Known Member

    I've been reading Divine Dungeon. Technically it's fantasy litrpg, but I want to mention it here. It's been known that I meditate in a weird way - not by relaxing.
    Yet in the world of DD, meditation in order to assimilate essence and gain levels is a normal thing. Adventurers don't just go to dungeons to get covered in guts and gold, they go there to meditate, gather energy and open their meridians. The warriors, assassins, wizards, barbarians, they're surprisingly spiritual people.

    I'd like to use the Divine Dungeon series as sort of a teaching instrument. Meditation isn't just boring mindful Zen-like staring at paint drying. It is a pretty damn cool cultivation of energy, gathering from surroundings, spinning and assimilating, drilling inside our bodies to access areas that felt blocked or sick before. And it feels so good. If you thought meditation must be boring, read the books, I put my official stamp of approval on that aspect. That's why I love to read fiction, it has elements like these that apply to my life more than non-fiction.
     
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  5. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Finished Babylon's Ashes. Probably the weakest Expanse book so far. Hoping book #7 is an improvement. Not long to wait now ...
     
  6. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Okay, polished off The Last Command, and that brings the SW Thrawn trilogy by Timothy Zahn to a close. Whew, that's ten days of Star Wars reading. Thrawn remains the best SW creation ever! It's a pity that his duration in the expanded universe didn't extend beyond this trilogy, and with him around, I would have been satisfied to see the utter destruction of the Rebel Alliance (now the New Republic). This should have been the true next cinematic sequel trilogy (eps. VII-IX), but Disney had to make all of this non-canon and give us the trash that was Star Wars: A Force Awakens.

    Also, the Noghri are the best anti-Ewoks. Thank you, Zahn!

    Now onward to finishing off Rite of Passage.
     
  7. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I am half way through Hyperion. I like it! Its a sci-fi Chaucer's Canterbury Tales.
     
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  8. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    What is your favorite story so far?
     
  9. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    So far, the Colonel's tale. That is some creepy excrement, right there. I hope to finish it tonight.
     
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  10. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Runcible Tales, a four novella book by Neal Asher. It's about runcibles.
     
  11. hrafnwasser

    hrafnwasser Well-Known Member

    Excellent - I used to own a runcible. Bloody hard to maintain. Spent more time in the workshop than being used. If I remember rightly I acquired it in a second hand stall in Bradford Market, in about 1979. Metallic silver. Paid £ 2 for it.

    Or am I thinking of something else?
     
  12. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    By the way, did you finish Neverness? Did you like it?
     
  13. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I didn't know the meaning of runcible. I have looked it up and I'm feeling even more confused than before...

    [​IMG]
     
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  14. hrafnwasser

    hrafnwasser Well-Known Member

    Don't be confused - my comments were just a flight of fancy, if you will. I tend to the absurd, dada-esque, now and then.
     
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  15. R-Hat

    R-Hat Well-Known Member

    Having finished Dakota Krout's Divine Dungeon and the third book not out yet, I needed my present reading to last a while longer. Can't devour a whole book like that, after I paid for it.
    So I looked up some "cultivation" literature. Cultivation is the kind of meditation that you absorb Chi energy from the environment and use it to improve your mind, body and spirit. I do that with a few older guys and ladies every Tuesday, and then in my spare time. But apparently, there is a broad literature genre around it in the far East. While western heroes drink nectar and eat ambrosia to get immortal, eastern heroes open their meridians, point by point, and ingest strange TCM concoctions. I was recommended to look at authors like Daman and Tinalynge. They happen to be Litrpg authors. But before I start with them, I found some free online amateur but decent quality literature, of the same type.
    The Divine Dungeon was the first litrpg that I saw using cultivation and it was all western fantasy. What I have now would be better described as a contemporary Chinese urban fantasy. It really makes me feel at home. No, I'm not suffering from a lifelong case of chuunibyou, but it sure is going to be a source of humor and irony. The cause of chuunibyou is supposed to be psychological, young people absorbing trends they find cool, even going to claim they have special powers like anime superheroes.
     
  16. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    As long you are not suffering from Evil Eye Chuunibyou, we can handle you...;)
     
  17. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Finished off the coming-of-age novel Rite of Passage by Alexei Panshin, which I enjoyed. I'm probably going to start the October book club selection Children of Time sometime soon, but first I'll read a few more stories from Heinlein's collection, The Past Through Tomorrow, which I had put on hold a while back.
     

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