SF/F Reading in May 2017

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by Boreas, May 2, 2017.

  1. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Well-Known Member

    Absolutely. An all round story is not a common encounter.

    It wouldn’t have to be outrageous though. I loved how well the Moties were drawn with its physiognomy, its subspecies, the three genders, their cast system, politics et al. but, as I have already mentioned, it equally surprised me how unchanged from the authors' decade convention the Empire of Man felt.
    Except for the space setting and science involved, it could well have been James Bond commanding the MacArthur while sipping a Dry Martini.
    I believe that just some social/ cultural tweaking would have done the job.
    Maybe Niven wrote about the Moties and Pournelle about The Empire of Man, or vice-versa…
     
  2. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Ok, so precisely 46% in to Daughter of Eden, and something has happened which has put a huge smile on my face. Really looking forward to the conclusion to this series now, after what's been a lacklustre start to the final book in the series.

    Although saying that, the lacklustre start may not seem so disappointing with hindsight on my side. I'm already seeing it in a different light after what's just happened.
     
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  3. irrlicht

    irrlicht Full Member

    I kept wondering when the culture would show up! Banks was a master of playing with people's expectations.
    Feersum Endjinn is such a pain to read if you're not a native speaker :D
    It has been a couple years, maybe I should try again. Tge Algebraist I loved, despite some dull sections. Only the ending and the lack of other books in that universe disappointed me slightly.
     
  4. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    'Cause it takes a bit for it to sink in that the Culture, possibly, is already there and has been playing the long game!
     
  5. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Well-Known Member

    Finished Dust and the final book has told a far more adventurous and entertaining story than Shift, in a way closer in pace to Wool and hence, it has been an enjoyable end to this trilogy.
    From the story point of view, there are some aspects, I was hoping to find resolution towards the end of Dust. However, they have been discreetly ignored. Shame Howey felt unnecessary to tie some loose ends. I can overlook a few holes in the plot but when some of the trilogy main premises feel somehow unsound, then I do miss the Aha! moment that I so enjoy in good mystery books.
    If it hadn’t been for the wonderful characterisation and emotional side of the story, I would have felt really different about this book because:
    • The Plan to cleanse the whole world by setting up 40 silos, knowing in advanced only one would be allowed to survive, but somehow they built too many: they kind of lost control over it. They let the project grow too big...
    • After having improved human race genetically during the last couple of centuries, why repopulate the whole world with only the 4000 people of one single Silo, when the other surviving silos would all have been equally full with genetically enhanced people.
    • What about the Nano-gas origin, how come this gas could just stay around the Silos without dispersing itself?
    • What about the danger of the survivors walking on the planet 200 years too soon?[/SPOILER

    I have also begun The Rise of Endymion and am enjoying it so far.
     
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  6. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So would you generally recommend this trilogy or would you say it's low priority reading?
     
  7. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Well-Known Member

    Well, I would say it is a very enjoyable low priority read. Shift was a very tedious book. However, I believe @TomTB found this second book the best out of the trilogy...;)
     
  8. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Indeed I did. I am an enigma.
     
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  9. Royce Sears

    Royce Sears Well-Known Member

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Mote in God's Eye! From the mechanics of the FTL travel to the first contact scenario, and the politics of the Empire, I thought it was a good novel--though as mentioned, a bit dated.

    I just finished the Red Rising Trilogy by Pierce Brown...WOW .. AMAZING BOOKS! Highly recommended reading! These novels are vaguely reminiscent of society stratification stories like Divergent and The Hunger Games, but on a much larger scale. Brown writes in a first-person POV from the perspective of Darrow, a young, low-born Red who loses his wife to the demands of Society. Darrow is recruited by the Sons of Ares into a plot to challenge the rules and laws of Society and sets him on a journey a Red could never have imagined. Full review's of Red Rising, Golden Son, and Morning Star are available on my blog.
     
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  10. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Well-Known Member

    I keep reading great reviews about Red Rising Trilogy. I have the first book and I think I will read it before long.
    If I remember well, I don't think this was one of @TomTB's favorite series. Mind you, our Tom is a.k.a. The Enigma...:)
     
  11. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    It was awful. So I guess I recommend it highly !?
     
  12. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So the main character in the Red Rising trilogy is an adult? I always thought he was going to be a teenager since people were saying they're YA books.
     
  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I guess @Diziet Sma is going to be the stand-in for @hand of fear for you in this forum?
     
  14. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Seems that way. I won't judge. Much.
    ;)
     
  15. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    And I started my re-read of Cibola Burn today. This was my least favourite of the Expanse books first time round, but it's still great, and I'm enjoying it so far. I suppose going in with the expectation that it doesn't add much to the overall story but is fun in itself, has helped.
     
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  16. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I've finally started on Robert A. Heinlein! Have been saying for the last two years that I'm going to read him and was procrastinating. Picked up his collection of future history stories, The Past Through Tomorrow, which was recommended by @ecgordon a while back as a good starting point.
     
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  17. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Well-Known Member

    Ehh...????

    Interesting. I have a copy of Stanger in a Strange Land. I look forward to reading your comments about The Past Through Tomorrow.
     
  18. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    HoF has impeccably poor taste in literature (well, he regularly disagrees with me as to what's good or not) :)
     
  19. jo zebedee

    jo zebedee Well-Known Member

    I found book 3 a huge disappointment. I'd still recommend Dark Eden to anyone - and then leave it there :(

    I read the first Jodi Taylor Chronicle if St Mary's and enjoyed it well enough. I'm now rereading The Handmaid's Tale before the TVs show
     
  20. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    @jo zebedee, did you ever get around to reading the sequel to Luna: New Moon?

    Might take me a while. I'm juggling through a couple of books, and I'm keeping the short story collection for when I have less reading time. SiaSL is a good book, though. I remember finding the dialogue dated in parts, but the full effect of the novel was pretty explosive. I read the unedited, restored version that they put out in the 1990's, which I'm guessing is what all the new copies would be now. I read this book the same summer I read Anna Karenina...I think it was back-to-back.
     
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