SF/F Reading in January 2018

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by Boreas, Dec 31, 2017.

  1. jo zebedee

    jo zebedee Well-Known Member

    The books at the start are not as good, that's for sure. But the middle books benefit from knowing the characters and historical events imho.

    But they are written as a series so each can standalone.

    But how Memory can be fully appreciated without knowing the relationship between Miles and Ilyan I'm not sure.
     
  2. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I just finished The Nomad.
     
  3. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I finished Theft of Swords (The Riyria Revelations #2) and I have enjoyed it for what it is. There is only so much one can expect from these boys and from the rest of the cast.

    I'm also back to Weaveworld. It is enjoyable, and I will finish it. I had heard so much from Barker style that I was obviously expecting much more from this story.
     
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  4. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    I've started listening to the audiobook of The Stand. It's almost 50 hours long!!! 4 hours in and it's still very much a case of setting the scene.
     
  5. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I enjoy that series. True, it's not Bleak House but then someone already wrote that! :)
     
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  6. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    Hmm.. I have never read that book. I may need to rectify that.
     
  7. mia

    mia New Member

    I just read the book of a new author Lauren King "Riven".

    I got a friend's report of this book and its amazing how deep it is. U cant stop reading it, cant wait for second to come out.

    you will not regret, trust me.
     
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  8. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    So quiet over here. I know we are a small group, but where is everyone? Down at the gym?:)

    And? how are you finding The Stand?


    I have read about 75% of A Wizard of Earthsea (Earthsea Cycle #1)
    by Le Guin. I am enjoying myself.
     
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  9. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    I'm 17 hours in now, and it's brilliant. Turns out it's heading in a fantasy direction, not the stereotypical post-apocalyptic direction I thought it would go in. Really strong character development and great narration (which has grown on me as I've progressed) .. I imagine I'll be picking up some more King after I've finished with this.
     
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  10. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Ps. I last entered a gym in 1998. I fainted.
     
  11. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I started re-reading Gardens of the Moon by Erikson.
     
  12. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Have you recovered yet? Mind you, it has only been, well, 20 years...:p

    This is a series I would also like to start this year. I mean it...
     
  13. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I have just started Lavondyss (Mythago Wood #2)
    by Robert Holdstock
     
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  14. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Is this a re-read for you? It's actually hard for me to decide which one is better, Mythago Wood or Lavondyss. I usually say MW since it's the first, but I could just as easily say the second.
     
  15. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    First time. I read MW about five years ago and wasn't aware it was a series until you mentioned it in this forum some time ago.
    Have you read the other books?
     
  16. Dtyler99

    Dtyler99 Well-Known Member

    Earthsea is the anti-Harry Potter. Every act of magic has an unintended consequence. Also saw you have Lathe of Heaven on your reading list. Pure LeGuin.
     
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  17. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Only three. These first two, and then like the 6th or 7th in the 'series', Avillon. Avillon is more of a direct continuation of Mythago Wood. Lavondyss has some connections to MW but is essentially its own story with a different protagonist and takes place something like a decade after MW. Also excellent. Some of the very best the fantasy genre has to offer, and rarely matched by anyone else I've read with respect to literary, thematic and mythic depth. And wholly British. Holdstock reaches deep into the psychological and mythic past of Celtic Briton. Holdstock and maybe Le Guin are probably some of the true successors to the likes of Morris and Eddison and Tolkien and Lewis. Most category fantasy is just superficial adventuring and scratching at topical issues in an attempt to showcase depth that is ultimately hollow (power disparity, class struggles, economic inequality, gender disparity, etc.). But I feel these authors go deeper and reach towards more fundamental questions of human nature, identity and being. A cut above. Holdstock and Le Guin are also influenced by Jung. Since you recently read A Wizard of Earthsea, her utilisation of Jungian archetypes should have been on full display, especially through Ged's final acquiescence in fully assimilating the 'Shadow'.
     
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  18. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    I'm rereading Galactic North, an Alistair Reynolds' short story collection. It is great, a top ten book for me, and explains much that happens in the Revelation Space mega-trilogy. Read it first and you will be much happier. Thanks again Boreas for the great rec.
     
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  19. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Absolutely. Jung's archetype, the shadow, our animal side, triggers the energy both creative and destructive. It took Ged a little while to grasp this.
    Besides, Jung was also a defender of the collective unconscious, a shared ancestral memory amongst all humans.
    Hence, the central premise of the brought about mythical symbology (myth imago) in Mythago Woods fits perfectly.

    Admittedly, I have only read the first HP. Harry toys with being a wizard in a children's world. Ged, on the other hand, becomes the ONE through pain and fear. Earthsea is a world, whose children can't afford to remain young and naïve for long, if they wish to survive.
     
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  20. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I think I might be reading this next. Along Neuromancer, that is.
     
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