SF/F Reading in January 2017

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by Boreas, Jan 1, 2017.

  1. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    Easy now .. that could cause things to go supernova ;)
     
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  2. jon snow

    jon snow Full Member

    About 4 chapters into A deepness in the sky. Hasn't drawn me in yet. We'll see.
     
  3. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Mmmm, it might be due to your current state of cuteness and fluffiness…
     
  4. Royce Sears

    Royce Sears Well-Known Member

    So, I have finished a few books recently: John Scalzi's Zoe's Tale, Ready Player One by Ernest Cline, and Caliban's War by James S.A. Corey.

    I hadn't read any of Scalzi's work before, but I am sufficiently impressed to pick up some more. I'm particularly intrigued by the Old Man's War series and am looking forward to tackling them. Full Review on my Blog

    Ready Player One was a fun read, I have to admit. The plot was thin but overall, it was done well. It was a fun ride back through the 80's. The geek in me enjoyed it. Full Review on my Blog

    Caliban's War! Two words... LOVED IT! Enough said.. even better than Leviathan Wakes! Full Review on my Blog
     
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  5. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So it was still great even
    without Miller? Was there another great character to compensate for the annoying Holden?
     
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  6. Royce Sears

    Royce Sears Well-Known Member

    Oh yes! Fantastic!
     
  7. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Have you read The Forever War? Old Man's War is like a very light version of Haldeman's book. Entertaining, but without the deeper, psychological punch. There are two or three fairly poignant moments, though. But there were also some moments where it felt like a caricature.
     
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  8. Royce Sears

    Royce Sears Well-Known Member

    I have not, but will add it to the list! Thank you!
     
  9. jon snow

    jon snow Full Member

    You read Zoe's Tale before Old Man's War? Wow.
     
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  10. jon snow

    jon snow Full Member

    Yah. I just want to hug myself so much that I don't read.
     
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  11. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Is it a YA? I have also read some comments making a comparison between Zoe Boutin Perry and Kvothe from The Name of the Wind. Both in their teens with a similar attitude. I found Kvothe a precocious, aloof character far to wise for his age. I haven't bother with Rothfuss' The Wise Man's Fear. Maybe I'm being unfair...
    So, what did you make of Zoe?
     
  12. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Well gee, if you liked Zoe's Tale, just think how good the first three books will be.
     
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  13. TomTB

    TomTB Administrator Staff Member

    I don't think I could physically bring myself to start a series midway through ... my reading OCD would kick in and stop my hands or eyes from working I'm sure.
     
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  14. jon snow

    jon snow Full Member

    Zoe is typical girl who has started to like boys but has an added responsibility
    she has an entire race who worships her like a god
    . She has her head screwed on and I wouldn't call her precocious or aloof in my books. (Have not read Name of the Wind).
     
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  15. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I am, on the other hand, more than happy to ignore the established reading order unless it is crucial to follow the characterisation and storyline. I find it sometimes that the first books in a series can be the weakest, as practice makes perfect with some authors.
    This has been my case with The Dresden Files. I have read the first two, they didn't grab me, but everyone keeps saying it only gets better.
    See, I should have skipped the first two.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
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  16. jon snow

    jon snow Full Member

    Well see, Old Man's War is probably the best book of the lot. Though book 3, The Last Colony was also very good.

    If there is somewhere online that merges The Last Colony and Zoe's Tale, that would be a real treat. Much like people did for Feast and Dance.
     
  17. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Sure! Some series best work is right at the beginning. What I meant was, I’m not too bothered about beginning a series halfway through, if this means sparing myself some mediocre books, even at the expense of ending up with some "loose ends". Not too many though...
     
  18. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member


    Finished Attanassio’s The Last Legend of Earth. I’m trying hard to explain why I have really loved this book but it is not going to be easy.

    I don’t think there is any point in explaining what the story is about because any synopsis would just oversimplify it and would turn it into a traditional Space Opera, and TLLoE is everything but traditional.
    Let’s just say it is a love story spanning Cosmos and time planes through pure chaos.

    TLLoE brings to mind the following adjectives: Wondrous, herculean, fascinating, chaotic, psychedelic, challenging and extremely provocative.
    Attanasio presents the story lines and the characters in a non judgemental way. He doesn’t spoon feed you the info. You need to work at it and interpret it and consequently, you reach your own conclusions.

    Conceptually is excitingly challenging: Attanassio presents philosophical concepts from a pure scientific point of view, only to tease and trap the reader to extrapolate these ideas ad infinitum if, of course, the reader dares.

    TLLoE is a plot and not character driven story. I personally tend to enjoy better the other way around it. It is simply a question of preference. I know Attanassio can draw beautiful characters as he did in Hunting the Ghost Dancer, so he has definitely won my loyalty as a reader.


    I need to digest this beast and brood over it for a while longer. As soon as I recover, I will continue with the Radix Series.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2017
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  19. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So glad you liked it, @Elvira! I knew you'd be a little stupefied after finishing. I was in a daze for days after reading it.
    Non-judgmental is spot on. It's that holistic view that he's so good at presenting, and such a view necessarily abnegates the post-modern mechanistic attitude of the universe that has dominated western culture over the last seventy years. Attanasio is one of the few science fiction authors that is interested in melding that fractured bridge between head and heart, mind and soul. And he taps deep into mythological consciousness to do it, specifically from his grounding in eastern philosophy. Did you like his transplanting the metaphysical concept of karma in scientific (well, pseudo-scientific) terms? I remember thinking that was pretty fabulous.

    Radix was the most challenging book of the four for me as I said previously. But I loved it.
     
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  20. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    To say I’m a little stupefied is a bit of an understatement. I feel more like my washing machine has just spat me out during the spinning cycle.

    Did I like it??!! Well, this was one of my favourite passages. I marked it and reread it several times. I have said before I'm not a fast reader, and with this book I had to slow down even more in order to grasp all the metaphysical concepts Attanasio was throwing at me.

    As a reminder ;)...

     
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