General art appreciation

Discussion in 'Other Media' started by Boreas, Jan 24, 2017.

  1. Dtyler99

    Dtyler99 Well-Known Member

    Deviant Art is to SFF fans what YouTube is to video junkies. You can get lost in it for days. The massive breadth and depth of galleries, and talent of the artists, is mind-numbing.
     
  2. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    33Cº over here. People are going crazy, running around in speedos and all...

    Everybody loves ice cream by daniellefw on @DeviantArt

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    Last edited: Jul 13, 2017
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  3. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Yesterday I spent the day in the hometown of Anders Zorn. I knew very little of his
    life and had just basic knowledge about his work. I thoroughly enjoyed visiting his home and museum.
    Here is a tiny sample:

    Night Effect 1885

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    In Wilkströms Studio - 1889

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    Dance in the Gopsmor Cottage,1914

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    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
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  4. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    The first one is Cruella?

    Second one is very nice. A painting of a model getting ready to be painted?
     
  5. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Ha! Cruella and 101 elkes...
    The second is part of his nude study (mostly of females) period. Zorn was admired for his talent and tremendous joie de vivre: he was a real tinker!
     
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  6. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Bosch is wondrous, the creator of monsters and chimeras. Despite the fact that his work seems to be a reflection of his religious beliefs, it never ceases to pull the viewer into a world of fantasy.
    I have always enjoyed Bosch influence on Dalí´s surrealism.
    You mgiht enjoy this thread.

    El Gran Masturbador by Salvador Dalí, 1929.

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  7. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Great thread Boreas, first time I've seen it. And all the incredible artwork is new to me as well.
     
  8. hrafnwasser

    hrafnwasser Well-Known Member

    Many apologies - I've deleted the image - not sure what happened.
     
  9. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Super Heroes, Flemish paintings and Elizabethan era fashion: Super Flemish project by Sacha Goldberger (26 images)
    Just a couple...

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  10. Dtyler99

    Dtyler99 Well-Known Member

    Did you ever read China Mieville's The Last Days of New Paris? If you know your Surrealists, then it's the book for you.
     
  11. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    I like surrealism and feel comfortable and inspired admiring some of the work of this incredible movement (Dalí, Miró, Buñuel and some others) I haven't read China Miéville yet. I have dithered about picking up his work after reading some polarising reviews. I guess I will add him to my scary TBR list... *sigh*
     
  12. Dtyler99

    Dtyler99 Well-Known Member

    The Last Days of New Paris is a novella, so length-wise, it's not insurmountable. It probably isn't the place to start with Mieville if one has never read him before, but given your affinity for the subject matter, it should be no problem (although it helps if you also have more than a passing familiarity with Paris). In an alternate history, the Germans won WW II and the book takes place in occupied Paris in 1950 where Surrealist artworks have come to life to battle the Nazis, and the Parisian resistance is splintered into rag-tag groups who believe in competing schools of Surrealist thought.

    There's a reason why Mieville is considered the Godfather of the New Weird.
     
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  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    An Eastern Beauty (late 19th century) by Léon François Comerre (1850-1916).

    Oil on canvas.

    One of the French Orientalists who came out of the academic École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, Paris, and who mostly concentrated on portraits & Oriental themes. Of his many portraits, I find this to be one of the most alluring. She's a beauty indeed.

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  14. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Invocation (late 19th century) by Frederic, Lord Leighton, Baron (1830-1896).

    Oil on canvas, size unknown. Private collection.

    While Flaming June is probably Lord Leighton's most recognisable and popular piece, I have always been drawn to the expression of this female figure in Invocation.

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    Here's a description of the painting I found online:

    "Invocation is one of artist Frederic Leighton's beautifully compelling images in which the focus is on a single female figure. In this painting, the spectator's eyes are drawn to the depiction of the woman who dominates the scene. She is clad in white draperies that are obviously inspired by the clothing worn by women in ancient Greek art. The woman also wears an expression of longing or pleading as she gazes up at a tiny golden figure (only the very corner of which, incidentally, is visible in the painting) on a fluted column.

    "At the base of the column there is a cluster of leaves and fruit. Dusky grapes cascade down the platform, their dark color complemented by the greens, golds, and russets of the lush leaves. This appealing still life can be interpreted as an offering, and the column an altar. The tiny golden statue is in fact an image of some Classical goddess, and it is to this object that the white-robed woman is paying homage. With these observations in mind, the subject of the painting becomes much more clear - the woman is in fact begging assistance from an unidentified goddess. The Classical details in the background also enhance the ancient setting.

    "Author and Leighton scholar Christopher Newall suggests that the woman in this work is either a dancer or singer who is looking to her Muse for inspiration. This is a perfectly plausible - not to mention charming - interpretation of the painting. Certainly, the title Invocation also reinforces this explanation. As with many of Lord Leighton's later works, however, one can enjoy the exquisite beauty of the painting without troubling too much over its exact meaning." —Description & analysis by 'Senex Magister' (hoocher.com)
     
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  15. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I enjoy this painting but I am a philistine:
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    The Scent of Rain by Leonid Afremov
     
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  16. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    I've come across Afremov's work on Deviantart before. I like it, too.
     
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  17. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Perseus Slaying Medusa (1876/1903) by Laurent-Honoré Marqueste (1848-1920).

    Marble sculpture. On permanent display at the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen, Denmark.

    A picture of the full statue showing the entire body of Medusa would necessarily mean zooming out and therefore loosing detail. I like this particular close-up where the lighting darkens the pure white marble for increased dramatic effect and where the dynamic expressions on both subjects are clearly visible. There is another similar marble sculpture by Marqueste titled Perseus and the Gorgon (1890), which is on permanent exhibition at the Musée des Beaux-Arts de Lyon, France.

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    "Perseus, the son of Zeus and Danaë, Princess of Argos, was entrusted with the mission of slaying Medusa, one of the three Gorgon sisters—wild creatures with a tangle of snakes for hair and a look that turned people to stone. To help him accomplish this perilous task, the gods gave him winged sandals and a shield, sword, and helmet of invisibility. Perseus went to the island where the Gorgon lived, surprised her in her sleep, and cut off her head.

    "The sculptor, Laurent Marquestre, chose to illustrate the moment before Medusa’s death. Grim faced, the hero holds her firmly to the ground to stop her turning round, thereby avoiding her fatal gaze. In a vain attempt to retaliate, she howls with rage and terror. The twisting of her body goes right up into her hair of snakes, one of which has coiled itself around Perseus’ wrist." —Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek's website
     
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  18. Safari Bob

    Safari Bob Well-Known Member

    I like this one:
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    "Old King Cole" by Scott Gustafson
     
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  19. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    The Sonata (1889) by Irving Ramsay Wiles (1861-1948, American).

    Oil on canvas, 112.4 x 66 cm. Located at the M. H. de Young Memorial Museum, San Francisco, U.S.A.

    Wiles was from Utica, New York, and he worked initially as an illustrator for American magazines. Later on, he devoted himself to portraiture and achieved success.

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