2016 SFF Releases

Discussion in 'Science Fiction' started by Boreas, Mar 7, 2016.

  1. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    So, this post on the blog finally get me checking out some of the genre releases for this year. There's just too many to keep up with, but a few have caught my eye.

    Already read/currently reading:

    Unforgettable by Eric James Stone (read)

    Stone, Eric James - Unforgettable.jpg

    Ancestral Machines by Michael Cobley (reading)

    Cobley, Michael - Ancestral Machines.jpg


    And the ones I know I definitely want to read are:

    The Medusa Chronicles by Alastair Reynolds & Stephen Baxter (tangential sequel to Clarke's A Meeting with Medusa novella)

    Cover 1 / Cover 2
    Reynolds, Alastair & Baxter, Stephen - Medusa Chronicles.jpg Reynolds, Alastair & Baxter, Stephen - Medusa Chronicles (2).jpg

    The Best of Alastair Reynolds by Jonathan Strahan & William Schafer (editors)

    Reynolds, Alastair - Beyond the Aquila Rift.jpg

    Luna: Wolf Moon by Ian McDonald (sequel to the excellent Luna: New Moon)

    McDonald, Ian - Luna, Wolf Moon.jpg

    The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories by Ken Liu

    Liu, Ken - The Paper Menagerie and Other Stories.jpg

    Supernova by C. A. Higgins (sequel to Lightless)

    Higgins, C. A. - Supernova.jpg

    The Malice by Peter Newman (sequel to The Vagrant)

    Newman, Peter - The Malice.jpg


    There are others that look interesting, but they're not a priority. And there seems to be another Alastair Reynolds book coming out this year according the blog post. If that's so, then I'll have plenty of Reynolds to read since I still haven't started his latest Poseidon's Children trilogy, yet.

    Which 2016 genre titles have caught your interest?
     
  2. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    The story sounds good, but how do they both write it? They each get to write every other word would be the only fair way.
     
  3. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    No idea what the modus operandi is when a couple of authors get together to write a book. The closest I've come to noticing a real difference was when I read Leviathan Wakes - I thought the Miller sections were written better than the Holden sections (and I'm not saying that because I didn't like Holden), so I was imagining each author writing one plot line each instead of working on both together.
     
  4. btkong

    btkong Administrator Staff Member

    Some goods ones there. Can't wait for the The Malice, which is probably the one I'd read out of these. Cobley's Humanity's Fire looks interesting though. I know Boreas reviewed it for the blog a while back and it looked pretty interesting. I'll probably add it to my list.
     
  5. jo zebedee

    jo zebedee Well-Known Member

    I'm looking forward to Ian McDonald's, too, the last one left me on a knifeedge.

    I'm also looking forward to Peadar O'Guillin's The Call, if anyone is into YA.
     
  6. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

  7. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    Someone sent me this link, but I didn't read it for fear of spoilers. It might not actually contain any spoilers, but I don't want to take the chance as I don't want to know anything about Alastair Reynolds new, solo novel when it comes out later this year. I'll settle for just the back blurb when I go to buy it.

    The new novel is going to be called Revenger.

    https://outtherebooks.wordpress.com...description-of-revenger-by-alastair-reynolds/
     
  8. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    The sequel to Sara King's fantastic Fortune's Rising, Fortune's Folly, is finally out.

    The fourth book in Edward Robertson's Rebel Stars series, called Ronin, will be released tomorrow. This series is the 1000 years later follow up to his very popular Breakers series. This series is great space opera.
     
  9. ecgordon

    ecgordon Well-Known Member

    I've only read one 2016 novel so far, Infomocracy by Malka Older. Others on my radar are:
    United States of Japan - Peter Tieryas
    Too Like the Lightning - Ada Palmer
    Sleeping Giants - Sylvain Neuvel
    Arkwright - Allen Steele
    After Atlas - Emma Newman
    Version Control - Dexter Palmer
    Babylon's Ashes - James S. A. Corey

    And in fantasy/horror:
    Certain Dark Things - Silvia Moreno-Garcia
    + if Scott Hawkins comes out with another book this year, really liked The Library at Mount Char.
     
  10. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

  11. Diziet Sma

    Diziet Sma Administrator Staff Member

    Many are new instalments in series I have not read. China MiƩville is in my TBR list but I can't comment about him nor his work. I read a while back Sergei Lukyanenko's The Nigth Watch. I enjoyed it at the time but obviously it didn't blow me away as I forgot all about it and I haven't read any other books in the series. Reviews are very positive about Lukyanenko's work. Maybe I should try The Day Watch.
     
  12. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Of course the biggie is Night Without Stars (Commonwealth: Chronicle of the Fallers #2) by Peter F. Hamilton on Sept 27. If you're familiar with his duology and trilogies, you know who Nigel Sheldon is. The founder of the Commonwealth. He's the star of this series and he's Hari Seldon, James Bond, Ian Cormac and Mark Whatney rolled into one. Be sure to read The Abyss Beyond Dreams first, and tell 'em a little puppy sent you.

    https://www.amazon.com/Night-Withou...471124882&sr=1-1&keywords=night+without+stars
     
  13. Boreas

    Boreas n log(log n) Staff Member

    But he was also kind of a dickish character in the Commonwealth duology, I thought. Best character was Paula Myo, whom I loved. MLM was the other incredible character. I do have plans to read more Hamilton, but I'm thinking his non-space opera like the Greg Mandel books one of his stand-alones.
     
  14. kenubrion

    kenubrion Well-Known Member

    Oh absolutely, Izzy was the nice guy in all the original Commonwealth books. I think he's the same here but 1000 years older and mellowed somewhat but when saving the universe is needed, he volunteers to great effect. It's really a brilliant book, totally unlike anything else he's written. Combines gothic-type horror with Revelation Space-type world building. It's actually pretty scary at times, the adversary is so unreal and pervasive and read it.

    Edit to mention although you probably know, it's a continuation of the Void story but 1000 years later. Think how that ended and you begin again here.
     

Share This Page