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Elsewhere

By / March 23, 2017 / no comments

There seems to be a lot going on across the web recently, or at least we’ve been noticing a lot of stuff. So here’s a bunch of stuff we thought we should bring to your attention.

As we showed in our posts during Black History Month, there’s an awful lot of Afrofuturism out there at the moment.

Here, for example, is an ongoing list of African science fiction, fantasy and horror. There’s a lot there already, and the list has barely got started.

And speaking of African sf, we’ve mentioned before Geoff Ryman’s ongoing 100 African Writers of SFF. Originally it was being published by Tor.com, but now the project has moved to Strange Horizons. Ryman has taken the opportunity to revise the first two chapters, Nairobi and Writers in the UK, and has added a third chapter, Cape Town – The Editors.

The Shadow SpeakerMeanwhile, as one example of what black sf writers are up against, here is Nnedi Okorafor talking about problems she faced over the cover for her novel The Shadow Speaker.

The Fifth Season (The Broken Earth)There’s also this fascinating interview with N.K. Jemisin, author of The Fifth Season, about the past, present and future of science fiction.

And for everyone interested in non-anglophone science fiction, this brief piece about science fiction in Urdu is interesting, even if we’re still missing an English translation of the thesis it links to.

The Unreal and the Real: The Selected Short Stories of Ursula K. Le GuinHere is Ursula K. Le Guin, whose most recent books are the career-spanning collections, The Unreal and the Real and The Found and the Lost, answering twenty questions from the Times Literary Supplement.

This was one of a series of recent pieces on sf in the TLS, including this essay by Roz Kaveney on “Science Fiction worth paying attention to“.

The Massacre of MankindAlso in the TLS, here is Jonathan Barnes reviewing a bunch of books related to The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells, including The Massacre of Mankind, the new authorised sequel by Stephen Baxter.

The Time Machine  The Island of Doctor Moreau  The Invisible Man  The War of the Worlds  When The Sleeper Wakes

And while we’re on the subject of H.G. Wells, Adam Roberts has just started reading through the complete works of Wells in chronological order. He’s writing about each book on his blog, and here, for example, are his impressions (along with links to where you can buy the books) on The Time Machine (Amazon), The Island of Doctor Moreau (Amazon), The Invisible Man (Amazon), The War of the Worlds (Amazon) and When the Sleeper Wakes (Amazon).

Revolt in 2100Another leading modern sf writer, David Brin, whose most recent books are  Chasing Shadows and the collection  Insistence of Vision, looks back at one of the greats. In this instance he considers what Robert Heinlein’s Revolt in 2100 has to tell us about living in the age of Donald Trump.

The Handmaid's TaleAnother writer worried about living in the age of Trump is Margaret Atwood, and in this essay she looks back on the writing of The Handmaid’s Tale, and considers what it has to say about today.

Perhaps not entirely detached from those worries, particularly given what the Snowdon revelations and the implications of Russian hacking of the American election, here’s an essay that wonders whether democracy can survive in an age of Big Data and Artificial Intelligence.

PavaneOne of the joys of contemporary British science fiction is Dave Hutchinson’s Fractured Europe sequence, beginning with Europe in Autumn, but if you detect in those books traces of an earlier master of British science fiction, you wouldn’t be mistaken. Here is Hutchinson explaining his love of the brilliant Pavane by Keith Roberts.

ArrivalArrival, the film version of Ted Chiang’s “Stories of Your Life“, continues to attract comment and attention. Here’s an article about the linguistic theory at the heart of the story. And here’s another piece about Jessica Coon, the linguist who served as a consultant on the film.

The Erstwhile: The Vorrh (2)Here’s Michael Moorcock considering two recent examples of the New WeirdThe Last Days of New Paris by China Mieville and The Erstwhile by Brian Catling.

And finally, here’s a few science stories that should inspire any budding science fiction writer:

 

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